On Intentions

On Intentions

Yesterday, I jumped out of bed and hopped on my bike, on route to Horseshoe Bay and as I was spinning up a hill on to work afterwards, there was a car behind me who I knew wanted to pass but couldn’t. When he finally had the chance to, he revved his engine and accelerated so quickly (that’s how you know they are angry) …only to have to stop a few meters away due to traffic.

You have no idea how many nonsensical things I experience while riding my bike but I am grateful for the exposure because it reminds me to practice patience and not get angry over little things. These days when I ride, I don’t feel bad about holding up traffic when I don’t have a choice because I will at most extend their commute by a minute or two! Totally the end of the world. But when you are sitting inside your metal box fuming at other cars, cyclists and pedestrians, you are not thinking rationally.

This incident reminded me of a great piece of advice a friend had just given me the night before:

Instead of judging someone for their actions, reflect on the intent behind their actions. Why did they do it? What was their state of mind?

Was the driver angry because of a cyclist holding him up on the road? Or was he really angry because of deeper issues such as work-related stress, an unhealthy lifestyle, body-image issues or just an unhappy life?

Actions are naturally louder than words but we judge ourselves by our own intentions, so why should we be judging other’s by their behavior? If it’s negative, you’ll only get riled up but life is too short and extraordinary to be angry!

When you start asking the questions behind the intent, you begin to develop a deeper insight of the situation, which will force you to become more compassionate and empathetic.

When it come comes to actions and intentions in other aspects of your life such as relationships, business and people you have to deal with in your daily life, start making an effort to be aware of the context behind what you see— speculate why that person did what they did or why something happened. You may be incorrect but you will come to a profound realization that there may be more underneath the surface. This increased clarity will calm you down, help you figure out the best solution for the situation and boost self-awareness so you will be able catch yourself if you ever find yourself caught in the some senseless situation.

Everything that irritates us about others can lead us to an understanding of ourselves. – Carl Jung

Last time I drove a car, I followed a slow truck the entire way to the US border when I could’ve easily passed him and drove much faster. The “past me” (who use to drive a lot) would’ve been impatient and speeding all the way to my destination but that day, all I wanted to do was relax and listen to my music. It really feels great to slow down once in a while.

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    On Rain, Waterbottles and Cyclists.

    On Rain, Waterbottles and Cyclists.

    Spring is finally upon us, which also means grey skies and wet roads in Vancouver. But like I said, the gloomy days only makes us appreciate our usual gorgeous sunny days a lot more! I can’t believe our abnormally warm winter passed by so quickly because now my favorite thermal jackets are too warm for rides and it is still light out when I’m riding home from work. Oh the joy! Descending mountains are still a chilly problem though.

    Do you ride in the rain?

    I take the Wilier out for my long morning rides before work but it usually ends up pouring when it comes time to ride home in the evening. I don’t mind getting soaked but knowing I have to clean my bike afterwards is the only reason I despise it… and the feeling of wet socks… yuck!! When I ride my rain bike (the Cannondale), I sometimes never clean or even re-lubricate the chains afterwards. I’m so terrible, I know. But when you want to be lazy, you gotta be lazy.

    rainy days... go away | I Fucking Love FItness

    You know what else I despise about cycling?

    Washing water bottles after a ride! My friend taught me a trick: to put it in the freezer to prevent bacteria growth and take it out when you are ready to wash it.  You can soak it in water + detergent but it’s hard to rinse it out completely, and you’ll probably get detergent-flavored water on your next ride. Delicious!

    Our rides tend to get extended which usually means getting home and starting a hectic post-ride routine so you won’t lose friends from being constantly late to engagements. My OCD-tendencies doesn’t help either because I need to do as much as I can and as fast as I can — showering, putting everything away (I hate mess), post-ride meal/snack, icing, stretching, foam-rolling, checking out the Strava stats… and then getting ready for whatever I have planned that evening. Washing water bottles is the last thing I need. Ugh.

    WIler + Rapha + I Fucking Love FItness

    These water bottles are so pretty but a pain in the arse!

    I’m all for cycling advocacy but what is wrong with commuting to work in lycra and a carbon road bike?

    I usually take my old bike but whenever I get a chance to do a long ride on a sunny morning, I’m going to take my fast bike out! Why would I spend so much money on a machine that gives me so much joy and let it sit around at home? She would get so lonely… poor thing.

    Like with everything else, the world generalizes cyclists. And then cyclists generalize cyclists. We have lycra-clad cyclists who tend to race on shared bike/pedestrian paths putting everyone’s lives in danger. Kids (I’m old now, okay) riding their bikes with their giant Beats on and not paying attention to the world around them. Hipsters weaving between cars in rush hour traffic on their fixies and completely disobeying traffic laws. People riding at night with absolutely NO lights and dressed in black… I’m totally not generalizing, I swear!

    But seriously, I’ve seen every single type of cyclist run red lights and stop signs, cut people off, scream at drivers… not ONE specific group. It’s just so natural in our human tendencies to make judgements. I admit, I totally judge. I hate entitled cyclists who run lights and have no respect for drivers, pedestrians and other cyclists. No, we are not better because we choose to ride our bikes— remind yourself you may occasionally drive or walk (gasp). However I don’t judge how fast or slow someone is riding, what kind of bike they are riding, what they are wearing or how many rules they are breaking (because I’m pretty sure I break 90% of them).

    I love reading articles about cycling (particularly in Vancouver) and I always get a good laugh reading the comments, which is a discussion I refuse to join. Topics including cycling and bike lanes are so controversial and there is no winning from any side because everyone is so passionate in their opinions. Wow, cycling is way up there now along with religion, politics, abortion and global warming. You gotta love it.

    But cycling is cycling and it makes me happy when I see others out on a bike— especially on rainy days. Ride bikes, people!! You won’t regret it.

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      Live Unapologetically

      Live Unapologetically

      Obsessed is just a word the lazy use to describe the dedicated.

      Be yourself. Everyone else is already taken. This is a silly quote because it just sounds pretentious but my friends jokingly tell me I’m obsessed with cycling all the time (…I don’t think they are joking) and you know what, I am obsessed! So what? 80% of my cycling friends are also”obsessed” with the sport but you have to ride to understand. It’s a great obsession.

      My weaknesses are shopping and food, and with all that free time I could accumulate from not riding my bike, I would indulge in those all day, everyday and be fat, broke and unhappy. Wouldn’t I rather be outside on my bike? I ride not only to get fit but I genuinely love love LOVE being out on my bike. It’s an indescribable feeling of freedom and complete euphoria— and it may also be the fact that people who spend more time outdoors in natural environments are much happier.

      An hour of running actually feels like an hour (or ten) but I can spend six hours on a bike and it will seem like only an hour has gone by. Time sure flies when you are doing something you love. I’m grateful that I have as much free time to ride as I do but in all honesty, I make the time to ride (it also helps not having obligations such as kids and family, thank god!). If you are passionate about something, you will do whatever it takes and give it your all.

      Despite how much I ride, I still have plenty of time to see my friends, go for dinners, work or just relax and do nothing at all. Balance is so important and I make it possible by choosing to do things that fulfills me in countless ways whenever I have free time.

      This doesn’t just go for cycling, but all aspects of your life whether it is the things you like to do, the words that come out of your mouth, the way you think, your philosophy on life, the people you hang out with, the things you believe in… never apologize for the choices you make if they make you ecstatic and on top of the world… never apologize for being yourself.

      Keep on doing what you love. Don’t let anyone discourage you or bring you down.

      Live unapologetically.

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